Suggested materials for Anzac Day

An Australian Army soldier reads the Ode at the Lone Pine Ceremony in Gallipoli.

The Anzac Day materials provided on this page are for downloading and use by organisations, schools and the general public on Anzac Day. There are several versions of the speeches within each category to provide a variety of content for you to choose from.



Dawn Service
 

Option 1
Sample: It is heartening to see the increasing number of people, especially our younger generations, attending these dawn services and the Anzac day march. 

Option 2
Sample: We meet here, at this bleak hour, on this day every year, to honour the heroism, tenacity, and resilience of that group of young men whose units were sent to Gallipoli.

Ex Service 

Option 1
Sample: We meet here today, not to glorify war or praise victors, but to remember those who have served our country during times of conflict and crisis, and to reflect upon their selfless sacrifice. 

Option 2
Sample: On this day, in the darkness, before dawn, the Anzacs stormed ashore in a place now known as Anzac Cove. It was our first major contribution to the world as a nation - Australia was only 14 years old. 

Option 3
Sample: This morning I would like to talk about three aspects of Anzac day; why do we commemorate Anzac day on the 25th April; what the name of the day represents; and the nature of the Anzac legacy.

General Public 

Option 1
Sample: This day marks the anniversary of the landing at Gallipoli. Like hundreds of thousands of our fellow citizens, who gather at memorials in cities, suburbs and towns across Australia, we have come here to commemorate one of the most significant events in our national calendar. 

Option 2
Sample: We are gathered here to honour the memory of those gallant men and women who sacrificed their lives in service to their country. By your presence here I know there is no doubt in your hearts and your minds that today is especially significant. 

Option 3
Sample: Time dims the memory of ordinary events, but not great events. In a nation’s history, great events - whether in peace or war - live in our memories regardless of time. They are deemed great not necessarily for what they achieved, nor for whether they were victories or successes.

Primary School 

Option 1
Sample: Anzac.... Now that’s an unusual word.... Originally it was not a proper word, it was a set of initials that described the Australian and New Zealand soldiers who were in Egypt in the First World War. 

Option 2
Sample: Anzac day is a day when we remember the anniversary of the landings of Australian and New Zealand soldiers or Anzac’s, as we now call them, on some beaches far away from Australian shores. The place where the Anzac’s landed is called Gallipoli, a part of a country called Turkey.

Secondary School 

Option 1
Sample: On this anniversary of the landing of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps troops at Gallipoli, we commemorate the event with a special sadness because for the first time, the men who made that fateful landing on the 25th of April 1915 are all but gone. 

Option 2
Sample: We meet today not to celebrate or glorify war, but rather to remember those who have served our country during conflict and crisis.